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Ergonomics

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Ergonomics
The Science of Human Measurement
The Science of Human Measurement

Ergonomics

Ergonomics, also known as human engineering or human factors engineering, is a science of designing products and interfaces to maximize the safety, comfort, and efficiency for the people who use them.

Carelli Design draws on the principles of industrial engineering, psychology, anthropometry (the science of human measurement), and biomechanics (the study of muscular activity) to adapt the design of products and workplaces to people’s sizes and shapes and their physical strengths and limitations. We also consider the speed with which humans react and how they process information, and their capacities for dealing with psychological factors, such as stress or isolation. Armed with a complete picture of how humans interact with their environment, we’re able to develop the best possible solution.

We design with people in mind

We view people and the objects they use as one unit, and ergonomic design blends the best abilities of people and machines. Unlike machines, humans need to sleep and they’re subject to illness, accidents, or making mistakes when working without adequate rest. Machines are also limited. They’re unable to repair themselves or adapt to unexpected situations as well as humans. An ergonomically designed product provides optimum performance because it takes advantage of the strengths and weaknesses of both its human and machine components.

Designing with people in mind often requires advanced technology, such as computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) programs and robots to simulate human responses. Other ergonomic tools may be relatively simple, such as two or three-dimensional mannequins that represent particular dimensions of the human body, such as seated height, arm length or reach. By using such tools, we are able create products that fit 90 percent of the possible users. Our engineers are able to evaluate the tools and systems people use in the course of their day, using simulations (replicas of workstations), vehicles, and other scenarios together with observations of people using products in the replicated environment.